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Home News Release Broadcast Engineering Students Prepared to Fill Skills Shortage

Broadcast Engineering Students Prepared to Fill Skills Shortage

December 16, 2008

The first group of students enrolled in the new Broadcast Engineering Technology program at Loyalist College is completing the semester with assurances that their training will have a positive impact on their career opportunities. The industry is experiencing a skills shortage resulting in a demand for hardware and software-skilled expertise in the fields of complex radio and television broadcasting, and satellite distribution systems. Industry professionals are taking an active role as members of the program’s advisory committee, providing input that is based on the expectations of today, and more importantly, the future.

As part of this preparation the students took an in-depth tour of CHEX-TV in Peterborough. “During the students’ recent visit to our facility I saw a thirst for knowledge that I don’t often see,” said Paul Ward, Chief Engineer of Corus Entertainment Inc. at CHEX. “We would be happy to employ people with the strong background that this new program offers.”

Adam Szego is a student in the program and also the class representative on the advisory committee. “It was important for the class to go to Peterborough and see what a professional small-market TV studio looks like and how it functions. Being on the advisory committee has helped me to understand how much of a demand there is for broadcast engineers. It feels awesome to know that there are great opportunities when we graduate. The Society of Broadcast Engineers accreditation which we will have means that we can work anywhere in Canada and the United States.”

“Over the past decade, Canada has experienced a decline in qualified technical resources,” added Frank Bruno, Vice-President of TV Engineering, Rogers Media. “Radio stations, TV stations, product vendors, service providers, and post-production and the movie businesses have been affected by the shrinking pool of educated young Canadians that consider broadcast engineering as a career. The Broadcast Engineering Technology program at Loyalist College is working hard to change this. By partnering with major Canadian entertainment companies, Loyalist has created a program that is modern and relevant. The world of multimedia has exploded and businesses are looking for young bright minds that understand the technology from the simple camera and microphone on your laptop to digital TV transmitters that are used to broadcast high definition television (HDTV) signals to your home or content to a cell phone.”

For more information regarding the Broadcast Engineering Technology program visit www.loyalistcollege.com.

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Media Contact:  Marilyn Warren, Communications, Loyalist College (613) 969-1913, ext. 2332 or Jane Harrison, Acting Dean of the School of Media Studies, (613) 969-1913, ext. 2437

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